Lifesaving
conversations

You can help answer the call
when someone says "I'm not ok"
on World Suicide Prevention Day

10 September 2020 

Join us on World Suicide Prevention Day - September 10 to remember loved ones lost and raise your voice and money to save lives.

The last few years have been so tough. For our farmers, rural communities, families – and everyone in Queensland. Together, we’ve made it through drought, floods and fire. And today, Queenslanders are rebuilding their lives and communities during a pandemic.

It’s no wonder there are more calls to Lifeline than ever before.

A single conversation can give a person in crisis the strength to go on – but not if their call for help goes unanswered.

Will you help make sure that no matter how bad things get, there is always someone to answer their call?

WALK WITH US

remember loved ones and raise funds

DONATE TODAY

donate to the 13 11 14 Crisis Support Line

PLANT A FLOWER

Add a flower to your community garden

Will you help make sure that no matter how desperate a person might feel in the aftermath of disaster or in the long years it takes to recover, there is always help at the end of the Lifeline 13 11 14 Crisis Support Line?

By supporting Lifeline, you can help keep those lines open across Queensland and provide a safety net for people who feel lonely, frightened, confused or desperately sad.

Nathan's Story

If you met Nathan, you’d never have known he was about to take his life.

That’s because on the outside, Nathan was smiling – but inside he felt hopeless, and suicide seemed like the only thing that would make it stop.

Nathan was lucky. As his life was slipping away, his stepfather intervened – just in time to save him. When Nathan woke up in his arms, his stepdad was crying.

Few people knew what he’d been through. He didn’t talk about his suffering, how he’d found a way out, or how he ‘thanks God every day’ that he’s still alive.

Instead he buried it, until a few years later when his 12-year-old cousin Zak took his own life.

Like Nathan, young Zak had kept his feelings all to himself.

“Zak dying was devastating, heartbreaking. It still hurts. To see the family go through all that was horrific. After he died I made a promise to do something for him,” Nathan told us.

That ‘something’ was simple: Nathan started talking.

He began sharing his story, and teaching people how important it is to ask for help instead of just putting on a brave face.

As he did so, Nathan learned how many other people are quietly suffering just like he was – and how powerful it can be when someone breaks their silence.

If you’re not ok, thinking about suicide or experience a personal crisis help is available. No one needs to face their problems alone.

If someone asks "R U OK?", you can let them know you're not ok and call, text or message Lifeline.

        

Please enter amount

$

Your Details

Payment Method

CVV
I'd like to add a little extra to help cover fees.